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On November 18, 2014, Open Whisper Systems announced a partnership with WhatsApp to provide end-to-end encryption by incorporating the encryption protocol used in Signal into each WhatsApp client platform. [153] Open Whisper Systems said that they had already incorporated the protocol into the latest WhatsApp client for Android, and that support for other clients, group/media messages, and key verification would be coming soon after. [154] WhatsApp confirmed the partnership to reporters, but there was no announcement or documentation about the encryption feature on the official website, and further requests for comment were declined. [155] In April 2015, German magazine Heise Security used ARP spoofing to confirm that the protocol had been implemented for Android-to-Android messages, and that WhatsApp messages from or to iPhones running iOS were still not end-to-end encrypted. [156] They expressed the concern that regular WhatsApp users still could not tell the difference between end-to-end encrypted messages and regular messages. [156] On April 5, 2016, WhatsApp and Open Whisper Systems announced that they had finished adding end-to-end encryption to "every form of communication" on WhatsApp, and that users could now verify each other's keys. [157] Users were also given the option to enable a trust on first use mechanism in order to be notified if a correspondent's key changes. [158] According to a white paper that was released along with the announcement, WhatsApp messages are encrypted with the Signal Protocol. [159] WhatsApp calls are encrypted with SRTP, and all client-server communications are "layered within a separate encrypted channel". [159] The Signal Protocol library used by WhatsApp is open-source and published under the GPLv3 license. [159][160]